5 Simple Steps For Creating a Minimalist Garden

Here are 5 simple steps for creating a minimalist garden. Minimalist gardens use a limited number of design elements. They are elegant, relaxing, clean and open. It’s a great landscaping style for modern offices, minimalist homes, or people who have a busy lifestyle.   When I create these type of designs, I make sure to include some elements that are already in side the home or office, so the garden will flow with their surroundings. Read on to learn how to create your own minimalist garden. 

  1. Analize the area to be landscaped

It is very important to know the conditions you have before you can grow or plant anything. Learning about your specific area of the garden, will help you to choose plants that are suited to it. There really is no need to waste money on plants that wont be happy in that particular environment. 

If you are unsure about the conditions of your soil, I hardly recommend sending a soil sample to University of Georgia Extension to get your soil test. You can easy order a soil test kit it (link below) for $10 – $15, which includes postage mailer. Some local garden centers like Pike Nurseries normally have them in stock. (call before to make sure they have them). 

Creator: JOHN AMIS
Credit: UGA

2. Create a design 

Start by asking you these questions, do you need privacy? Sitting area? Attract pollinators? maintenance free? Water feature? Only evergreens? Do I need irrigation? How much budget do I have? 

You may want to do it in stages… etc. 

Then divide the area into landscape and hardscape. Fun shapes give the garden a different perspective. 

3. Select the plants

Think wisely about the plants that you will be using, keeping in mind the perspective that less is more. 

I recommend to use 3 layers of plants, privacy plants (taller than 8 feet), small shrubs and ground covers. 

If you need privacy, use only one type of plant that can be edged like Fragrant tea Olive (with the plus of a delicious flower essence) or if you would like movement you can add some rectangular pots with yellow or black bamboo. Never plant bamboo in the ground unless you want bamboo in all your garden, it is very invasive.  

As for the small shrubs you can use wintergreen boxwoods and trim them as balls. Plant them at a good dstance, about 4 – 5 feet apart to they grow like independemt balls. 

Like Japanese gardens? If you would like to have a minimalist Japanese garden, Japanese maples and ferns are a must. 

Growncovers come in many colors, textures and prices. Some of the most affordable and easy to keep alive are dwarf mondo grass, regular mondo grass, ajuga reptans, sweet flag and Asiatic jasmine. 

4. Keep your design focused on simplicity

As a designer and plant lover, I have to tell you that is so easy to go overboard with this sort of design idea and soon wandering out of minimalism! But if you make a list of a few plants to use, maybe only 2 colors and keep the planting area to minimal, you will make it happen!  

The key to good minimalism garden design is to create simple, clean lines free of clutter and use only a few type of plants. 

Begin by using mostly neutral tones or even only greens. You may want to add some color by using a splash of color with flowering perennial plants such Iris or foxgloves. Just make sure you plant a bunch of them only in one area of the garden

5. Add a water feature

Adding water feature to your garden design will allow you to boost to the sensory experience of your backyard or front yard, bringing life and movement to any outdoor space. Make sure to hide all the workings are hidden. Seeing them will make the garden look messy. Personally I like to add water into the gardens, not only because can be a beautiful central point or even a master piece, but because will definitely attract life into the space. From butterflies to birds will enjoy fresh water daily. 

Looking for minimalist garden inspiration?

LINKS:

http://aesl.ces.uga.edu/soiltest123/Georgia.htm

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